When an INTJ decides let someone burst into flames.

Letting people burst into flames. It’s a way that Mark Gungor describes what perfect people do when they don’t care about someone when he talks about the flag page personality. I am not a perfect personality, but I do identify with this concept. I don’t like using this phrase in its original definition though. If I didn’t really care about the person or thing, then I wouldn’t be letting them burst into flames because I wouldn’t interact with them at all. Instead, I use the phrase with people that I do interact with beyond a stranger level. How?

Sometimes I let people burst into flames as a sign of disagreement with something that has been decided.

Sometimes I let people burst into flames as a sign of rebellion.

Sometimes I let people burst into flames because people are screwing up and I know that they are, but one of two things happen:

  1. I say something and they ignore it, so I decide to keep quiet and wait in anticipation for the moment where things go wrong and they realize that I was right and they were wrong.
  2. I know that regardless of whether I say anything or not they will persist in their screwing up and I will not waste my time, so I decide to keep quiet and wait in anticipation for the moment where things go wrong.

Sometimes I let people burst into flames because I think that they deserve it.

The first impression is that these reasons are cruel reasons, I know. The thing is that in order to let people burst into flames they should have had an interaction with me first. It’s not always cruel in nature. Sometimes it has the same mindset as when a parent decides to not force a child to not do something that they know is wrong because the child will not listen to them and they have to learn that they are screwing up as the effects of the screw up takes place.

As an INTJ, allowing people to burst into flames is an indicator of letting these people go because they don’t value what I have to say or trust that what I’m saying is right. It’s an act of accepting the reality that when people think that they are better than me and that there is no way they can be wrong the best thing for me to do is to let go… and let them burst into flames.

Allowing people to burst into flames is an act of self-love. It’s an act where I release myself from any responsibility of the outcome of other people’s screw ups.

It is true that sometimes I do it as a silent “screw you” to the people who I decide that I should stay silent and watch get burst into flames, but it happens after giving them opportunities to do better. Do I enjoy it? At times, yes I do.

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